Category Archive: Try Some Techniques

Meditation, Brain Training, and the Detachment Technique — More

Here’s a previous post that ties in with the post of May 30, 2012. I’m doing all the stuff that’s suggested by the new neuroscience. I have to acknowledge improvement in my intuitive thinking — but not enough yet. I have to notice those flashes more and write them down. Just listened to The Queen’s …

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Back to the Beginning: Catherine Price, O, and Negative Self-Talk

If the topic is in O it must be big. And if you’re a free-lance writer, whose articles are regularly published in O you must be a very cool, excellent, smart, writer. That’s what I think after reading some of Catherine Price’s articles and going to her web page. http://catherine-price.com/ In contrast, “Aiming Higher” by …

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Wisdom and Detachment — WOW

> Here’s a short youtube video about improving problem-solving skills by moving away from the problem; a type of detachment. Ethan Kross is the University of Michigan research and assistant professor of psychology. You can find more on detachment by looking under Try Some Techniques. Here are a couple of links to earlier (1/14 and 1/19/2011) …

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Eliminate Disclaimers and Overripe Apologies

>A recent experience in a group discussion reminded me of a “the more things change, the more things stay the same.” The topic was the status of education in the U.S. A frequent contributor and articulate woman prefaced half of her comments with disclaimers. E.g. “I don’t have anywhere near the experience you do in …

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Buddha and the Brain

>Have you noticed lately a plethora of books and articles connecting Buddha and brains? Buddha’s Brain and Contemplative Science: Where Buddhism and Neuroscience Converge are a couple of the books and here’s a link to a PT article. http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/neuro-atheism/201101/buddhism-and-neuroscience I’m not sure why or how this sudden interest in the connection between Buddhism and …

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Have Compassion for Yourself

>Goria Steinem, dubbed the “most familiar face of the women’s movement” in a recent  NYTimes article,  says while talking about her own retrospective view of herself;  “I saw how uncertain, how vulnerable I seemed.. . . In the moment, women are more likely to be self-critical. Looking back you have compassion for yourself.” Whether you’re …

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Preventing An "Undignified State" of Inaction

>”To understand worry is to know it calmly and clearly for what it is: transient, contingent and devoid of intrinsic identity. Whereas to misunderstand it is to freeze it into something fixed, separate, and independent. Worrying about whether a friend still likes us, for example becomes an isolated thing rather than a part of a …

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Say No — Once this Weekend

>I recently read a brief article about busyness as a way to escape from thinking about things we don’t want to think about; also as a reason  why people avoid meditation. Then I ran across the article ( link below) about busyness from a PT blogger, who suggests therapy might be needed in serious cases …

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Create Space by Being in the Moment

>Although weekends can be stressful in their unique way, focusing on here and now, a tricky achievement, can help. A suggestion was made at yoga this morning that we create more space between each negative thought, so that rather than one negative thought, e.g. “I never should have said that,” bursting in air into twenty …

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A Right Brain Approach to Getting Yourself Through “Upsets”. H-m-m-m-m again.

As those of you who follow intelligentwomenonly.com know, I’ve been recovering from the unexpected loss of a good friend. And you also know that I’m a realistic thinker — not doing any negative self-talk. I’m sad, but no guilt, regrets, should haves in regard to my relationship with Lucy and her family. I ‘ve always …

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